April 15th, 2014
April 14th, 2014

"Someday, far in the future, people will remember the struggles of deaf people fighting a world of ignorance and equate them to the likes of the great battles for civil rights, and against slavery." — Gianni Manganelli

The fight continues, friend.

April 12th, 2014

(via memewhore)

thatdisneylover:

marmarbinks3:

I see 2007 and think “oh 3 years ago” and then it hits me that it was 7 fucking years ago

image

(via dutchster)

The years between eighteen and twenty-eight are the hardest, psychologically. It’s then you realize this is make or break, you no longer have the excuse of youth, and it is time to become an adult – but you are not ready.
Helen Mirren (via mystiquel)

(Source: omybestbeloved, via until-the-very-end)

April 11th, 2014
bubbalicious28:

I’m dying

bubbalicious28:

I’m dying

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via dutchster)

April 9th, 2014

(via dutchster)

carldrogothecat:

regrets lol.

(via catsncuddles)

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

stunningpicture:

Milk in cookie cup.

(via absolutejoke)

stunningpicture:

Cookie in a milk cup.

stunningpicture:

Cookie in a milk cup.

(via absolutejoke)

imgfave:

See more in Funny

imgfave:

See more in Funny

(Source: mekagojira3k, via dutchster)

In aeternum.

Some time ago there was once a boy who commenced to Irvine from his home in Santa Monica so he could attend University High School where I also attended high school. An awesome friend and a good person to have around. His name was Gianni ‘Gio’ Thomas Manganelli, and he was a furcifer. There were so many laughs.

One clear memory of knowing him was summer 2002, when he was my best friend’s first crush and he asked her to be his 99% girlfriend at the end of the week. Shrugged when she asked Gianni what the other 1% was for. We were so young that summer, talking about what we wanted to do when we grew up. Everything was still possible. We never knew that in high school, years later and now eight years ago, we’d achieve a dream together after four years of hard work and lots of fun. And that it would be the best thing ever. But I never expected this.

There are very few things that will defeat the feeling of looking at your best friend and teammate seconds after winning first place and just knowing it was something you both worked for for four whole years. He was so proud, and I couldn’t be more prouder to hail from University High School that moment. And to be sitting next to him there, on the stage. That’s what I will forever remember.

On the days I smile, it doesn’t mean I’ve forgotten how I could have been a better friend. Looking back, I never asked, or offered a hug. Like many others, I assumed he was fine and wouldn’t need help. I can only learn from that. It will always hurt, and there will always be a blank where his life could have been. Regardless, I am okay and things 

Please reach out to those around you, even if it doesn’t seem like they need it. <3 You are stronger than you think. Requiescat in pace, furcifer.image

April 8th, 2014
vicemag:

The Polish Soldier Who Snuck Into Auschwitz and Was First to Report on the Horrors Inside
On September 19, 1940, Witold Pilecki, a Polish soldier, was captured by German SS officers and sent to the concentration camp in Auschwitz. Considering he was a spy, things had turned out exactly as he’d planned. Captain Pilecki’s mission was to organize resistance from within the most horrific symbol of the Holocaust, send information to the Allies, and record the horrors he witnessed for the sake of history.
Pilecki arrived in Auschwitz sometime in the evening between September 21 and 22, 1940, and described what he found as “another planet”—a hell in which every building’s walls were covered in swastikas and corpses lay everywhere. Pilecki went on to live in inhumane conditions for nearly 1,000 days and become the first person to inform the Allies about the appalling conditions of detention and the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime.
Pilecki’s comprehensive 1945 report on his undercover mission was published in English in 2012 under the title The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery. Yet, for some reason, his story still isn’t widely known. I wanted to know more about the career of this exceptional man, so I got in touch with the people who recently translated the book in French—former director of the AFP bureau in Warsaw, Urszula Hyzy, and Patrick Godfard, who is a professor of history.
VICE: The book was published in English in 2012, with the New York Times describing it as “a historical document of the greatest importance.” How come it was only translated to French now?Urszula Hyzy and Patrick Godfard: Pilecki was a “disturbing” character for the Allies, who pretended for a long time not to know what was happening in the camps, and for the Communists, who were responsible for his death in 1948. In communist Poland, it was forbidden to talk about Pilecki and his children were barred from higher education.The Auschwitz Volunteer remained in the archives of the Polish Underground Movement Study Trust in London [Studium Polski Podziemnej] before being discovered by the historian and former prisoner Józef Garlinski, who wrote Fighting Auschwitz: The Resistance Movement in the Concentration Camp in the 1970s. It was not until after the end of the Cold War that the book was published in Poland.
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vicemag:

The Polish Soldier Who Snuck Into Auschwitz and Was First to Report on the Horrors Inside

On September 19, 1940, Witold Pilecki, a Polish soldier, was captured by German SS officers and sent to the concentration camp in Auschwitz. Considering he was a spy, things had turned out exactly as he’d planned. Captain Pilecki’s mission was to organize resistance from within the most horrific symbol of the Holocaust, send information to the Allies, and record the horrors he witnessed for the sake of history.

Pilecki arrived in Auschwitz sometime in the evening between September 21 and 22, 1940, and described what he found as “another planet”—a hell in which every building’s walls were covered in swastikas and corpses lay everywhere. Pilecki went on to live in inhumane conditions for nearly 1,000 days and become the first person to inform the Allies about the appalling conditions of detention and the atrocities committed by the Nazi regime.

Pilecki’s comprehensive 1945 report on his undercover mission was published in English in 2012 under the title The Auschwitz Volunteer: Beyond Bravery. Yet, for some reason, his story still isn’t widely known. I wanted to know more about the career of this exceptional man, so I got in touch with the people who recently translated the book in French—former director of the AFP bureau in Warsaw, Urszula Hyzy, and Patrick Godfard, who is a professor of history.

VICE: The book was published in English in 2012, with the New York Times describing it as “a historical document of the greatest importance.” How come it was only translated to French now?
Urszula Hyzy and Patrick Godfard: Pilecki was a “disturbing” character for the Allies, who pretended for a long time not to know what was happening in the camps, and for the Communists, who were responsible for his death in 1948. In communist Poland, it was forbidden to talk about Pilecki and his children were barred from higher education.

The Auschwitz Volunteer remained in the archives of the Polish Underground Movement Study Trust in London [Studium Polski Podziemnej] before being discovered by the historian and former prisoner Józef Garlinski, who wrote Fighting Auschwitz: The Resistance Movement in the Concentration Camp in the 1970s. It was not until after the end of the Cold War that the book was published in Poland.

Continue